755 Park Avenue,
Suite 100,
Huntington,
NY 11743
(631) 223-0400
 
 

Dr. Krawitz and Huntington Eye Care have been
Awarded a Crystalens National Center of Excellence.

Cataract Surgery and Intraocular Lens Choices

 

As you get older, the natural lens inside your eye becomes firm and opaque, reducing visual clarity, decreasing contrast details, and causing glare. When the lens begins to reduce vision, it is known as a cataractous lens, or a “cataract,” for short.

During cataract surgery, the lens is dissolved using ultrasound and vacuumed out of the eye. In its place, Dr. Krawitz places an intraocular lens implant.

Cataract surgery using a no-stitch technique represents a wonderful opportunity for you to both improve vision AND become less dependent upon glasses.

Dr. Paul Krawitz is the only ophthalmic surgeon in Suffolk County, and one of only a handful in New York State, who is certified in all the intraocular lens types implanted at the time of cataract surgery.

This article explains the advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the basic and deluxe intraocular lens implants available to you. Based upon your examination findings, Dr. Krawitz will make a recommendation of which lens or lenses are most appropriate for you.

Dr. Krawitz performs over 500 cataract surgeries per year, and our staff members are experts in the latest cataract surgery techniques and intraocular lens technology.

 


Basic Monofocal Lens

The prefix, “mono” means one, and a monofocal intraocular lens works best at one distance. In most cases, the lens is calculated to give good distance vision so that the patient will need eyeglasses to see objects which are close. With a monofocal lens, it is possible that you will need eyeglasses for both near (reading, needlepoint) and intermediate (computer, seeing prices in a store, viewing a picture on a wall) distances.

The monofocal lens is the only intraocular lens implant that is completely paid for by Medicare and other insurance companies.

Patients who choose this lens do so either because they are cost-conscious or because Dr. Krawitz recommends it due to other ocular health issues.

 

 


Multifocal Lenses

The prefix, “multi” means many, and a multifocal lens works at many different distances. There are two models of multifocal lenses, the AMO ReZoom and the Alcon ReSTOR. Both lenses have a series of rings in the lens that create different points of focus in the back of the eye.

ReZoom multifocal intraocular lens implantPatients who have ReZoom lenses implanted are less dependent upon glasses than patients with monofocal lenses. The ReZoom lens works best for distance and intermediate vision. Some patients who have ReZoom lenses implanted often require a reading eyeglass for reading vision. Additionally, because of the ring design, patients sometimes have increased glare at night which cannot be predicted before surgery.

   

Patients who have ReSTOR lenses implanted are also less dependent upon glasses than patients with monofocal lenses. The ReSTOR lens works best for distance and near vision. Some patients who have ReSTOR lenses implanted often require an eyeglass for intermediate vision, such as seeing prices on a store shelf. Additionally because of the ring design, patients sometimes complain about reduced contrast on bright days, when their pupils are small.

Medicare and supplemental insurers and other insurance companies pay for a portion of the cataract surgery. However, they do not pay for the additional costs associated with implanting the ReZoom or ReSTOR lens. Flexible payment plans are available.

 

 


Flexible Accommodating Crystalens

Accommodation is the ability to focus on near and intermediate distances due to the actions of the focusing muscle of the eye. And Crystalens is the only FDA approved intraocular lens that provides patients with the ability to focus naturally, due to its flexibility.

Patients who have Crystalenses implanted are also less dependent upon glasses than patients with monofocal lenses. And unlike multifocal lenses that

have rings which can cause optical distortion and haloes, the smooth, clear Optic of the Crystalens provides clear and undistorted vision, with excellent contrast and outstanding clarity of color and details.

The Crystalens moves as the eye focuses, bringing objects into focus naturally, and the way your eye used to work when you were 35 or 40 years of age.

Approximately 50% of Crystalens patients never use glasses, and over 95% percent of Crystalens patients rarely use glasses. Crystalens does not provide very close vision, such as reading very fine print on medicine bottles. But for many near and intermediate tasks, vision is superb.

Crystalens is the deluxe lens implant technology favored by Dr. Krawitz for most patients.

Medicare and supplemental insurers and other insurance companies pay for a portion of the cataract surgery. However, they do not pay for the additional costs associated with implanting the Crystalens. Flexible payment plans are available.


 


Toric Intraocular Lens Implant – For Patients with High Astigmatism

The Alcon Acrysof Toric Lens corrects astigmatism, which is the oval shape of the eye that causes visual blurring.

While wearing strong eyeglasses after cataract surgery to correct your astigmatism is an option, cataract surgery with the toric intraocular lens implant provides you with an opportunity to be more independent of eyeglasses after surgery.

Most patients with astigmatism who have the toric lens implanted do not require eyeglasses for distance vision. However, eyeglasses will be required for close vision.

Medicare and supplemental insurers and other insurance companies pay for a portion of the cataract surgery. However, they do not pay for the additional costs associated with implanting the toric lens implant. Flexible payment plans are available.

Questions about Crystalens®? Click here.